The Works

The Works

Type:VideoLanguage:EnglishCategories:Personalities FeatureArts & CultureStatus:On going Description: RTHK' s The Works focuses on Hong Kong's arts and cultural scene.

The Works features news and reviews of visual and performing arts, design, literary and other “ works ” .

Added illumination comes from interviews with leading performers and producers, interspersed with updates on events affecting the development of the territory 's artistic and cultural life. There's also a regular critical review of what' s on at the movies, and – most weeks – a live studio performance.

If you want to discuss anything you see on the programme, please visit our Discussion Board via the link at the top left of the page, or email us at theworks@rthk.org.hk

The Works is aired on TVB Pearl every Tuesday at HKT 1900 -1930.

Live webcast & RTHK31: Wednesday HKT 0100 - 0130

Archive available later after live webcast. ** Please note that the programme air-time on TV is different with webcast time.



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Hollywood talent agency goes into the artworld, Maurice Benayoun's 00:22:00 2016-04-27
Many artists are working more and more across disciplines: painting, performing, dancing or mixing different media in their work. Some collaborate with fields outside the world of the gallery: like fashion, music and film, as shown –for example – in Steve McQueen’s “12 Years A Slave”. Movie stars have a long tradition of being represented by talent agencies that get them film parts and good deals. Now, at least one of those talent agencies is deciding it’s time it got its 10% - at a conservative estimate – of certain artists too.

French artist Maurice Benayoun mixes photography, video, virtual reality, and large-scale installations to explore different concepts in his work. In 1995, when the worlds of the internet and virtual reality were still much less developed than today he already created a virtual tunnel that linked Paris and Montreal. Two decades later, he’s created a new virtual tunnel. This one’s in Hong Kong.

American artist Robert Rauschenberg, who died in 2008 at the age of 82, was sometimes called a Neo-Dadaist, and is considered a pioneer of mixed media and collage. He’s also known as one of the precursors, or even originators, of the “Pop Art” movement, who worked with painting, installation, photography, printmaking and performance art. Until mid-May, Pace Hong Kong is showing a selection of signature works created by Robert Rauschenberg from the end of the 1970s to the early 1990s.

Megan Sterling, principal flautist with the Hong Kong Philharmonic has been with the orchestra for more than a decade. This Friday and Saturday she will be playing Reinecke’s Flute Concerto in the orchestra’s Belshazzar’s Feast programme, which also includes music by Beethoven and Walton.

Last Thursday, the music world lost – in one blow – a dazzling guitarist, one of its most prolific songwriters, a highly esteemed and successful music producer, a singer, an accomplished multi-instrumentalist, and an occasional actor, all in one go. “His Purple Badness” Prince died at 57, alone at his home in Minnesota. Not everyone might have been into the particular brand of funk pop for which he was best known, but beyond that, Prince was a musician’s musician, respected for the wide range of his skills, a sometimes frighteningly single-minded work ethic, and his determination to maintain his artistic independence and integrity. He played the guitar, piano, drums, bass, saxophone and more. His music spanned rock, funk and jazz. And yet, one of his most recent tours and albums involved just Prince, sitting down at a piano and singing. We were lucky enough to have him in Hong Kong in 2003, opening Harbour Fest to an enthusiastic crowd of 13,000. Here he is in action.